nvidia-kernel-dkms debian buster kernel 5.3

If you use the 5.3 kernel with a Debian Buster install ( ie: Proxmox 6.1 ) you will find that the kernel module for the nvidia driver version 418.X fails to build.
Fortunately it’s an easy fix.
First you need to create a file in your sources.list.d directory:


echo 'deb http://deb.debian.org/debian buster-backports main non-free contrib
deb-src http://deb.debian.org/debian buster-backports main contrib non-free
' > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/buster-backports.list 

 
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Custom Proxmox Instalation as a Workstation

If you read my other article in this topic Here for Proxmox 5.0 or Here for Proxmox 6.0 after following all the steps you have a fully functional proxmox server installation.
 
But you might be wondering “Can I use proxmox in my workstation?”.

The answer is “Sure you can, but you might want/need to follow a few extra steps,make sure you install the pve-headers, or else you’ll have problems with packages that need the linux kernel headers.
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Installing ARM64 Debian 10 ( Buster ) in a virtual Machine

If you run Proxmox VE > 5.3 and want to test an ARM64 virtual machine, it’s kind of easy.
drop by the Debian Buster iso download site,
 
I’ll be using the debian-10.3.0-arm64-netinst.iso, the same process might work with Debian 9 but I didn’t tested it.

If you just want the working configuration click here
 
With that out of the way let’s explain the needed steps to get a vm up and running.
First create a generic machine with the following configuration, remember to check the “Advanced” box.
keep note the ID of the machine, you will need it to edit the configuration file.
Continue reading “Installing ARM64 Debian 10 ( Buster ) in a virtual Machine”

Shell Script to get the network list by domain name

If you followed my guide HERE and HERE you might be wondering if there is no easier/more automated way of doing it, and in fact there is a simple script that you could build.


#!/bin/bash
if [ "$#" -eq 0 ]; then
  echo "Usage: ./${0}  [v4|v6]"
  exit 1
fi

FILTER="route"
if [ "$#" -eq 2 ]; then
  if [ "$2" == "v4" ]
  then
     FILTER="route:"
  fi
  if [ "$2" == "v6" ]
     then
         FILTER="route6:"
  fi
fi

WHOISSERVER="whois.radb.net"
IPN=$(dig +short $1 | head -1)
ASN=$( whois -h ${WHOISSERVER} ${IPN} | grep -i origin | tr -s " " | cut -d " " -f2)
for i in $ASN; do
  whois -h ${WHOISSERVER} -- "-i origin ${i}" | grep ^${FILTER} | tr -s " " | cut -d " " -f2-
done

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Get IP address Space By AS(Autonomous System) Number

Sometimes you need to get all possible address blocks of a network but most of the time there is no easy way to figure it out, looking at you Facebook and Google, but fear not sysadmin we have one handy trick up in our sleeve, by using whois with the AS number of the company we can build this kind of list.
 
We’ll use Facebook(AS32934) as an example, but it should work for any Autonomous System.


whois -h whois.radb.net -- "-i origin AS32934" | grep ^route | tr -s " " | cut -d " " -f2-

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Zombasite error while loading shared libraries: libpng12.so.0

If you are trying to run Zombasite GoG Version and the game is not starting properly what you can do to try and debug the issue is to run in in a terminal and see the output.


~/GOG\ Games/Zombasite/start.sh

 
If you get de following output:


Running Zombasite
./Zombasite: error while loading shared libraries: libpng12.so.0:
 cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory


 
This output means you are missing at least libpng12.
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Install proxmox 6.0 on top of Debian Buster

This is mostly a copy&paste of the article about installing Proxmox 5.X on top of Debian Stretch, but with the links and repositories updated to the new Debian Buster and Proxmox 6.X

The default proxmox installation ISO is notably minimalist, and one way to be able to do simple customization and have a little bit more flexibility to for example choose the partition layout or use an encrypted LVM is to first make a basic Debian installation and then upgrade it to a full blown Proxmox Installation.

This process is simple, fast and is described in detail at the official proxmox wiki here

But here is the tl;dr version with a few extras and useful modifications from the original article:

Start by making a minimal installation of Debian 10,ie. at the software selection screen check only “SSH server” and “standard system utilities”.
After installation boot to your new Debian machine and be sure that you can resolve the host-name of your machine, the command bellow must return an IP address that is not ‘127.0.0.1’.
This step is important because Proxmox expect to have a “real”( non localhost) IP or else the installation of the package ‘proxmox-ve’ will fail during post-install.
Continue reading “Install proxmox 6.0 on top of Debian Buster”

RIP Sound Card Audio in Linux

Sometimes you need a quick and dirty way of ripping the audio of your sound card, in Linux you can easily do it with the following script:


#!/bin/bash
set -x
WAV="$1"
if [ -z "$WAV" ]; then
    echo "Usage: $0 OUTPUT.WAV" >&2
    exit 1
fi
rm -f "$WAV"

# Get sink monitor:
MONITOR=$(pactl list | egrep -A2 '^(\*\*\* )?Source #' | \
    grep 'Name: .*\.monitor$' | awk '{print $NF}' | tail -n1)
echo "set-source-mute ${MONITOR} false" | pacmd >/dev/null

# Record it raw, and convert to a wav
echo "Recording to $WAV ..."
echo "Close this window to stop"
parec -d "$MONITOR" | sox -t raw -b 16 -e signed -c 2 -r 44100 - "$WAV"

 
Store it somewhere in your PATH, and when you need to record the audio just use it as:


./soundRipper.sh output.wav

 
If you don’t want to store wave files you can convert it as shown HERE

Sources:

https://outflux.net/blog/archives/2009/04/19/recording-from-pulseaudio/
https://www.pantz.org/software/alsa/recording_sound_from_your_web_browser_using_linux.html

Convert wav files to mp3

When you want to convert a wave file to MP3, one of the simplest ways you’ll find is by using ffmpeg.

If you use Debian, you can install it with:

apt install ffmpeg

 
If you use Centos you can install it following this steps:

sudo rpm -v --import http://li.nux.ro/download/nux/RPM-GPG-KEY-nux.ro
wget http://li.nux.ro/download/nux/dextop/el7/x86_64/nux-dextop-release-0-5.el7.nux.noarch.rpm
yum localinstall nux-dextop-release-0-5.el7.nux.noarch.rpm -y 
yum update
yum install ffmpeg -y

 
After that, you just need to specify the files input and output names

ffmpeg -i input.wav -acodec mp3 -ab 256k output.mp3

 

Sources:

https://lonewolfonline.net/convert-wav-mp3-linux/
https://linuxadmin.io/install-ffmpeg-on-centos-7/